Evidence Based Practices

Victor utilizes a significant number of evidence-based practices in our programs. An evidence-based practice (EBP) is traditionally defined in terms of a "three legged stool" integrating three basic principles:

  1. The best available research evidence bearing on whether and why a treatment works
  2. Clinical expertise (clinical judgment and experience) to rapidly identify each patient's unique health state and diagnosis, their individual risks and benefits of potential interventions
  3. Client preferences and values
The people have been the most help out of anyone we have gotten services from all over the County. Getting services from Victor was like the light at the end of the tunnel. We just didn't know how to be a cohesive family and now we can be.

Aggression Replacement Therapy

Aggression Replacement Therapy is a part of .

​Aggression Replacement Training® is a cognitive behavioral intervention program to help children and adolescents improve social skill competence and moral reasoning, better manage anger, and reduce aggressive behavior.The program specifically targets chronically aggressive children and adolescents ages 12-17.

Developed by Arnold P. Goldstein, Barry Glick, and John Gibbs. Aggression Replacement Training® has been implemented in schools and juvenile delinquency programs across the United States and throughout the world. The program consists of 10 weeks (30 sessions) of intervention training, and is divided into three components—social skills training, anger-control training, and training in moral reasoning. Clients attend a one-hour session in each of these components each week. Incremental learning, reinforcement techniques, and guided group discussions enhance skill acquisition and reinforce the lessons in the curriculum.

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training is a part of .

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is for everyone 16 or older—regardless of prior experience—who wants to be able to provide suicide first aid. Shown by major studies to significantly reduce suicidality, the ASIST model teaches effective intervention skills while helping to build suicide prevention networks in the community.
Virtually anyone age 16 or older, regardless of prior experience or training, can become an ASIST-trained caregiver. Developed in 1983 and regularly updated to reflect improvements in knowledge and practice, ASIST is the world’s leading suicide intervention workshop. During the two-day interactive session, participants learn to intervene and help prevent the immediate risk of suicide. Over 1,000,000 people have taken the workshop, and studies have proven that the ASIST method helps reduce suicidal feelings for those at risk. 

Workshop features:

  • Presentations and guidance from two LivingWorks registered trainers
  • A scientifically proven intervention model
  • Powerful audiovisual learning aids
  • Group discussions
  • Skills practice and development
  • A balance of challenge and safety

https://www.livingworks.net/programs/asist/ 

Cognitive Behavior Intervention

Cognitive Behavior Intervention is a part of .

Cognitive-Behavior Interventions (CBIs) refer to a number of different but related interventions used to change behavior by teaching individuals to understand and modify thoughts and behaviors. Problem solving, anger control, self-instruction, and self-control are examples of interventions under the umbrella of CBI. Typically, students learn to recognize difficult situations that have produced inappropriate/violent responses, then identify and implement an acceptable response. Students also learn to restrain aggressive behavior using covert speech. Through various teaching and role-playing activities, students will more consistently engage in appropriate behavior when faced with the various situations that have caused problems in the past.

Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions have shown effectiveness across educational environments, disability types, ethnicity, and gender. For example, positive effects were demonstrated in large urban high schools, private schools with enrollments of over 200 children, and residential facilities. They have also demonstrated positive effects on adolescents who have emotional and/or behavioral disorders, learning disabilities, mental retardation, depression, and other problems associated with dropping out. They have been shown effective in studies that involved male and female African-American and Caucasian students.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a part of .

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (also known by its abbreviation, CBT) is a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving. Its goal is to change patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people’s difficulties, and so change the way they feel. It is used to help treat a wide range of issues in a person’s life, from sleeping difficulties or relationship problems, to drug and alcohol abuse or anxiety and depression. CBT works by changing people’s attitudes and their behavior by focusing on the thoughts, images, beliefs and attitudes that we hold (our cognitive processes) and how this relates to the way we behave, as a way of dealing with emotional problems.

An important advantage of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is that it tends to be short, taking four to seven months for most emotional problems. Clients attend one session per week, each session lasting approximately 50 minutes. During this time, the client and therapist are working together to understand what the problems are and to develop a new strategy for tackling them. CBT introduces them to a set of principles that they can apply whenever they need to, and which will stand them in good stead throughout their lives.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can be thought of as a combination of psychotherapy and behavioral therapy. Psychotherapy emphasizes the importance of the personal meaning we place on things and how thinking patterns begin in childhood. Behavioral therapy pays close attention to the relationship between our problems, our behavior and our thoughts.

Crossroads (NCTI)

Crossroads (NCTI) is a part of .

Since 1981, Crossroads (NCTI) has been developing offense-specific, cognitive curricula and staff development training for use in the criminal justice system. NCTI is a leader of cognitive behavior change programs. 

NCTI has developed a variety of skill-based training resources, including participant workbooks for juveniles and adults, facilitator guides and teaching aides. These training resources are organized into delivery formats that vary in intensity level and duration to more appropriately meet the needs and address the risk level of offenders, whether misdemeanants or felons.

NCTI assists criminal justice agencies in two specific areas. The first area focuses on developing and providing offense-specific curricula designed to address the learning styles of the offender population, both adult and juvenile. NCTI’s cognitive curricula uses, as its foundation, a unique philosophical approach called the "Building Blocks for Behavioral Change", that align with evidence-Based research. The second area focuses on training criminal justice professionals in a host of areas that challenge them to strengthen their skills both personally and professionally.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Dialectical Behavior Therapy is a part of .

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive-behavioral treatment approach with two key characteristics: a behavioral, problem-solving focus blended with acceptance-based strategies, and an emphasis on dialectical processes. "Dialectical" refers to the issues involved in treating patients with multiple disorders and to the type of thought processes and behavioral styles used in the treatment strategies. Therapists follow a detailed procedural manual and DBT has five components: 

  1. Capability enhancement (skills training); 
  2. Motivational enhancement (individual behavioral treatment plans); 
  3. Generalization (access to therapist outside clinical setting, homework, and inclusion of family in treatment); 
  4. Structuring of the environment (programmatic emphasis on reinforcement of adaptive behaviors); and 
  5. Capability and motivational enhancement of therapists (therapist team consultation group). DBT emphasizes balancing behavioral change, problem-solving, and emotional regulation with validation, mindfulness, and acceptance of patients. 

 

Early Identification Intervention Services

Early Identification Intervention Services is a part of .

The Early Identification Intervention Services program identifies infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills.

The program provides or coordinates the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs.

Families and Schools First (FAST)

Families and Schools First (FAST) is a part of .

Families and Schools First (FAST) is an evidenced based early intervention program targeting families with children in kindergarten-third grade identified as at-risk. The program utilizes a multi-family group format designed to build on children’s strengths, empower parents and build a peer support network. 

Functional Family Therapy

Functional Family Therapy is a part of .

Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is built on an integrated theoretical foundation, and systematic research evidence that demonstrates its efficacy and effectiveness for reducing serious criminal behavior in youth. As a true family therapy, FFT targets the family relational system as the entry point and primary target for systematic and individualized treatment. FFT is:

  • A clinical core consisting of a integrated set of guiding theoretical principles,
  • A systematic clinical intervention program that relies upon phase-based change mechanisms,
  • A well-developed multi-domain clinical assessment and intervention techniques,
  • A systematic quality improvement system that monitors case planning, client progress and process changes, model specific adherence, and client outcomes

Functional Family Therapy was developed in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s by Jim Alexander and Bruce Parsons. Since that time, a number of model developers have contributed to the model (Barton, Waldron, Turner, Sexton, among others).  The most recent published independent manual for FFT was by the Institute for the Prevention of Violence (Blueprints) (Alexander, Pugh, Parsons, & Sexton, 2000).  That manual is the basis for the Annie E. Casey sponsored FFT Clinical Training Manual (Sexton & Alexander, 2004).  The recent book, FFT in Clinical Practice (Sexton, 2011) brings the lessons of practicing FFT to the theory and science.

Incredible Years

Incredible Years is a part of .

Incredible Years is a set of three interlocking, comprehensive, and developmentally based training programs for children and their parents and teachers. These programs are guided by developmental theory on the role of multiple interacting risk and protective factors in the development of conduct problems. The three programs are designed to work jointly to promote emotional and social competence and to prevent, reduce, and treat behavioral and emotional problems in young children, as follows:

The Incredible Years child program. The Dinosaur School child training prevention program consists of more than 60 classroom lesson plans (approximately 45 minutes each) for three age levels, beginning in preschool through second grade (3-8 years). Lesson plans are delivered by the teacher at least twice weekly over consecutive years. The small group treatment program consists of 18-22 weekly sessions (2 hours each) offered in conjunction with the training programs for parents of preschoolers or school-age children. The child program aims to strengthen children's social and emotional competencies, such as understanding and communicating feelings, using effective problem-solving strategies, managing anger, practicing friendship and conversational skills, and behaving appropriately in the classroom. 

The Incredible Years parent programs. Three training programs are available for parents of babies and toddlers (up to 30 months), preschoolers (3-5 years), and school-age children (6-12 years). The lengths of the parent programs vary from 12 to 20 weekly group sessions (2-3 hours each). The programs focus on strengthening parent-child interactions and relationships, reducing harsh discipline, and fostering parents' ability to promote children's social, emotional, and language development. In the programs for parents of preschoolers and school-age children, participants also learn how to promote school readiness skills; in addition, these parents are encouraged to partner with teachers and become involved in their children's school experiences to promote children's academic, social skills, and emotional self-regulation and to reduce conduct problems. Each program includes protocols for use as a prevention program or as a treatment program for children with conduct problems and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

The Incredible Years teacher program. The teacher training program is delivered to early childhood and elementary school teachers of young children (3-8 years) and consists of 42 hours (6 days) of monthly workshops delivered by a trained facilitator. The program focuses on strengthening teachers' classroom management strategies; promoting children's pro social behavior, emotional self-regulation, and school readiness; and reducing children's classroom aggression and noncooperation with peers and teachers. The training also helps teachers collaborate with parents to support parents' school involvement and promote consistency between home and school.

In each program, trained facilitators use videotaped vignettes to structure the content and stimulate group discussions, problem solving, and practices related to participants' goals.

Learn Empower Advocate Persevere (LEAP)

Learn Empower Advocate Persevere (LEAP) is a part of .

LEAP (Learn Empower Advocate Persevere) is a program that provides intensive advocacy services and evidenced based interventions to youth  involved with Riverside County Department of Social Services and Riverside County Probation. This is a strength based intervention implemented to resolve immediate family crisis and help each family and youth create support systems in their community. 

Love and Logic Parenting

Love and Logic Parenting is a part of .

We offer Love and Logic parenting classes so that parents or guardians can learn to enjoy a better relationship with their kids. Parents want to enjoy their kids, have fun with them, and enjoy a less stressful family life. At no time in history have parents been more unsure of their parental role. Even the best are not all that sure about whether they are using the best techniques. They say that their kids don't appear to be much like the ones they knew in years past.

A lot of conflicting philosophies have been presented over the last 30 years. Many of these sound good, but don't seem to do the job of helping children become respectful, responsible, and a joy to be around. Many ideas, offered with the best of intentions, center around making sure that kids are comfortable and feeling good about themselves in order to have a good self-concept. However, we have discovered that self-confidence is achieved through struggle and achievement, not through someone telling you that you are number one. Self-confidence is not developed when kids are robbed of the opportunity to discover that they can indeed solve their own problems with caring adult guidance.

Matrix Model of Recovery

Matrix Model of Recovery is a part of .

The Matrix Model is an intensive outpatient treatment approach for stimulant abuse and dependence that was developed through 20 years of experience in real-world treatment settings. The intervention consists of relapse-prevention groups, education groups, social-support groups, individual counseling, and urine and breath testing delivered over a 16-week period. Patients learn about issues critical to addiction and relapse, receive direction and support from a trained therapist, become familiar with self-help programs, and are monitored for drug use by urine testing.

The program includes education for family members affected by the addiction. The therapist functions simultaneously as teacher and coach, fostering a positive, encouraging relationship with the patient and using that relationship to reinforce positive behavior change. The interaction between the therapist and the patient is realistic and direct, but not confrontational or parental. Therapists are trained to conduct treatment sessions in a way that promotes the patient's self-esteem, dignity, and self-worth.

Motivational Interviewing

Motivational Interviewing is a part of .

Motivational interviewing is a form of collaborative conversation for strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. It is a person-centered counseling style for addressing the common problem of ambivalence about change by paying particular attention to the language of change.

It is designed to strengthen an individual's motivation for and movement toward a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person's own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.

Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training

Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training is a part of .

In the late 1960's, researchers began to investigate how to identify children at risk for failure to thrive, abuse or neglect. In 1971, Dr. Kathryn Barnard, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Family and Child Nursing at the University of Washington, initiated research that brought the ecology of early child development closer to the level of clinical practice by developing methods for assessing behaviors of children and parents. She identified environmental factors that are critical to a child's well-being and demonstrated the importance of parent-child interaction as a predictor of later cognitive and language development. These assessment tools, widely known as the NCAST Feeding and Teaching Parent-Child Interaction scales, were initially taught in 1979 to over 600 nurses in a series of eight classes via satellite in the U.S. After the satellite training experiment ended, NCAST (Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training), under the direction of Georgina Sumner, started offering a Certified Instructor Workshop in Seattle. These professionals gained reliability in the use of the Feeding and Teaching Scales and after obtaining certification as an NCAST Local Instructor went back to their communities to teach others in the use of the scales. 

In the 1980's NCAST became a self-sustaining organization at the University of Washington that reached beyond traditional academic or continuing education programs to advance knowledge around the world for the benefit of families and children. The Feeding and Teaching Scale program was updated in 1994 and is currently known as the Parent-Child Interaction (PCI) Program. 

Parent Project

Parent Project is a part of .

AT VCSS San Bernardino we have adopted the Parent Project® as a key intervention program. The mission of the Parent Project® is to develop parent-training programs for parents raising difficult or out-of-control children. We are committed to providing highly effective programs that are affordable for every parent. At the Parent Project®, we believe that parents are the answer. In our 27 years, this program has worked with over ½ million parents raising difficult or out-of-control children. The programs are based on these experiences and successes. No matter how difficult the situation may be, this program can help. "Little miracles". It's what we the Parent Project® is all about.  The Parent Project is now the largest court mandated juvenile diversion program in the country and for agencies, the least expensive intervention program available today.

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy is a part of .

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an empirically-supported treatment for young children with emotional and behavioral disorders that places emphasis on improving the quality of the parent-child relationship and changing parent-child interaction patterns. PCIT International was created to promote fidelity in the practice of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy through well-conducted research, training, and continuing education of therapists and trainers. By creating an interface between the scholarly activities of PCIT researchers and the expertise of front-line clinicians, PCIT International promotes healthy family functioning.

The goals of PCIT International are to:

  • Foster the growth and expertise of the network of local, regional, national, and international PCIT therapists
  • Highlight the research activities and clinical innovations developed by the PCIT community
  • Empower parents to make changes that will lead to a nurturing and secure relationship with their children
  • Improve the lives of children and families worldwide through the provision of sound, empirically-based assessment and treatment.

SUCCESS 1st Early Wraparound

SUCCESS 1st Early Wraparound is a part of .

Success First is an early wraparound program to capture those seriously emotionally disturbed, unserved, underserved children/adolescents, age 0-15 years, to provide services, keeping them in the lowest level of care possible. A referral is reviewed by a Referral Management Team & if enrollment approved, client assigned to an agency (contractor). Referrals can come from anyone including:

  • CCRT
  • Clinic
  • Group Home 
  • Hospital
  • School
  • Family
  • Law Enforcement
  • Contractor
  • CFS
  • Probation

Someone who qualifies for this program is seriously emotionally disturbed child or adolescent, age 0-15 years, who:

  • is in need of crisis intervention and/or at risk of psychiatric hospitalization,
  • is at risk of removal from their home,
  • is having problems in school or is at risk of dropping out, 
  • is at risk of or currently involved in juvenile justice system,
  • is homeless or at risk of homelessness,
  • has co-occurring disorders,
  • is a high user of services or multiple hospitalizations,
  • is at risk due to lack of services because of cultural, linguistic, or economic barriers,
  • is uninsured,
  • is at risk due to exposure to domestic violence, physical abuse, emotional abuse, verbal abuse, or sexual abuse. 

 

Screening Assessment Referral and Treatment

Screening Assessment Referral and Treatment is a part of .

The guiding vision for the Children's SART (Screening Assessment Referral and Treatment) Model of Care is: Children ages 0 - 5 within the context of their families, will be screened, assessed, and referred for treatment through a universal collaborative and standardized process that strengthens and builds on existing programs in the community. It is an integrated system of health and behavioral health and child welfare, which will ensure access to appropriate early intervention services for children (0 -5 years of age) in San Bernardino County. 

The core over-arching strategy is the development of a comprehensive Model of Care for children at risk for developmental, emotional, or behavioral problems due to exposure to alcohol and other drugs, child abuse and neglect, and/or other environmental or developmental factors.

Second Step

Second Step is a part of .

Second Step is a classroom-based social-skills program for children 4 to 14 years of age that teaches socio-emotional skills aimed at reducing impulsive and aggressive behavior while increasing social competence. The program builds on cognitive behavioral intervention models integrated with social learning theory, empathy research, and social information-processing theories. The program consists of in-school curricula, parent training, and skill development. Second Step teaches children to identify and understand their own and others' emotions, reduce impulsiveness and choose positive goals, and manage their emotional reactions and decision making process when emotionally aroused. The curriculum is divided into two age groups: preschool through 5th grade (with 20 to 25 lessons per year) and 6th through 9th grade (with 15 lessons in year 1 and 8 lessons in the following 2 years). Each curriculum contains five teaching kits that build sequentially and cover empathy, impulse control, and anger management in developmentally and age-appropriate ways. Group decision making, modeling, coaching, and practice are demonstrated in the Second Step lessons using interpersonal situations presented in photos or video format.

 

Seeking Safety

Seeking Safety is a part of .

Seeking Safety is a present-focused treatment for clients with a history of trauma and substance abuse. The treatment was designed for flexible use: group or individual format, male and female clients, and a variety of settings (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, residential). Seeking Safety focuses on coping skills and psychoeducation and has five key principles: (1) safety as the overarching goal (helping clients attain safety in their relationships, thinking, behavior, and emotions); (2) integrated treatment (working on both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance abuse at the same time); (3) a focus on ideals to counteract the loss of ideals in both PTSD and substance abuse; (4) four content areas: cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, and case management; and (5) attention to clinician processes (helping clinicians work on countertransference, self-care, and other issues).

Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS)

Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS) is a part of .

SPARCS stands for Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress.  SPARCS is a 16-session group intervention that was specifically designed to address the needs of chronically traumatized adolescents who may still be living with ongoing stress and may be experiencing problems in several areas of functioning.  These areas include difficulties with affect regulation and impulsivity, self-perception, relationships, somatization, dissociation, numbing and avoidance, and struggles with their own purpose and meaning in life as well as worldviews that make it difficult for them to see a future for themselves.  Overall goals of the program are to help teens cope more effectively in the moment, enhance self-efficacy, connect with others and establish supportive relationships, cultivate awareness, and create meaning in their lives. Group members learn and practice each of the core SPARCS skills throughout the intervention and frequently report use of these skills outside of group. Core components of this intervention include Mindfulness practice, relationship building/communication skills, Distress Tolerance, and Problem-solving and Meaning Making. Treatment also includes psychoeducation regarding stress, trauma, and triggers.

Thinking for Change

Thinking for Change is a part of .

Thinking for a Change (T4C) is a cognitive–behavioral curriculum developed by the National Institute of Corrections that concentrates on changing the criminogenic thinking of offenders. T4C is a cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) program that includes cognitive restructuring, social skills development, and the development of problem-solving skills.

T4C combines cognitive restructuring theory and cognitive skills theory to help individuals take control of their lives by taking control of their thinking (Bush, et al. 2011). The foundation of T4C is the utilization of CBT principles throughout the group sessions. There is an extensive body of research that shows cognitive–behavioral programming significantly reduces recidivism of offenders (Landenberger and Lipsey 2005).

T4C stresses interpersonal communication skills development and confronts thought patterns that can lead to problematic behaviors. The program has three components: cognitive self-change, social skills, and problem-solving skills. Lessons on cognitive self-change provide participants with a thorough process for self-reflection concentrated on uncovering antisocial thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and beliefs. Social skills lessons prepare participants to engage in prosocial interactions based on self-understanding and awareness of the impact that their actions may have on others. Finally, problem-solving skills integrate the two other components and provide participants with a step-by-step process to address challenges and stressful situations they may encounter.

Transition to Independence

Transition to Independence is a part of .

The TIP Model™ prepares youth and young adults with EBD for their movement into adult roles through an individualized process, engaging them in their own futures planning process, as well as providing developmentally-appropriate and appealing supports and services (Clark & Hart, 2009). The TIP Model™ involves youth and young adults (ages 14-29) in a process that facilitates their movement towards greater self-sufficiency and successful achievement of their goals. Young people are encouraged to explore their interests and futures as related to each of the transition domains: employment and career, education, living situation, personal effectiveness and wellbeing, and community-life functioning. The TIP system also supports and involves family members and other informal key players (e.g., parents, foster parents, an older sister, girlfriend, roommate) as relevant in meeting their needs and those of the young person.

Trauma Focused-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Trauma Focused-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a part of .

Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (also known by its abbreviation, CBT) is a short-term, goal-oriented psychotherapy treatment that takes a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving. Its focus is on those who have experienced trauma. Its goal is to change patterns of thinking or behavior that are behind people’s difficulties, and so change the way they feel. It is used to help treat a wide range of issues in a person’s life, from sleeping difficulties or relationship problems, to drug and alcohol abuse or anxiety and depression. CBT works by changing people’s attitudes and their behavior by focusing on the thoughts, images, beliefs and attitudes that we hold (our cognitive processes) and how this relates to the way we behave, as a way of dealing with emotional problems.

An important advantage of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is that it tends to be short, taking four to seven months for most emotional problems. Clients attend one session per week, each session lasting approximately 50 minutes. During this time, the client and therapist are working together to understand what the problems are and to develop a new strategy for tackling them. CBT introduces them to a set of principles that they can apply whenever they need to, and which will stand them in good stead throughout their lives.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can be thought of as a combination of psychotherapy and behavioral therapy. Psychotherapy emphasizes the importance of the personal meaning we place on things and how thinking patterns begin in childhood. Behavioral therapy pays close attention to the relationship between our problems, our behavior and our thoughts.

Triple P

Triple P is a part of .

The Triple P--Positive Parenting Program is a multilevel system or suite of parenting and family support strategies for families with children from birth to age 12, with extensions to families with teenagers ages 13 to 16. Developed for use with families from many cultural groups, Triple P is designed to prevent social, emotional, behavioral, and developmental problems in children by enhancing their parents' knowledge, skills, and confidence. The program, which also can be used for early intervention and treatment, is founded on social learning theory and draws on cognitive, developmental, and public health theories. Triple P has five intervention levels of increasing intensity to meet each family's specific needs. Each level includes and builds upon strategies used at previous levels:

  • Level 1 (Universal Triple P) is a media-based information strategy designed to increase community awareness of parenting resources, encourage parents to participate in programs, and communicate solutions to common behavioral and developmental concerns. 
  • Level 2 (Selected Triple P) provides specific advice on how to solve common child developmental issues (e.g., toilet training) and minor child behavior problems (e.g., bedtime problems). Included are parenting tip sheets and videotapes that demonstrate specific parenting strategies. Level 2 is delivered mainly through one or two brief face-to-face 20-minute consultations. 
  • Level 3 (Primary Care Triple P) targets children with mild to moderate behavior difficulties (e.g., tantrums, fighting with siblings) and includes active skills training that combines advice with rehearsal and self-evaluation to teach parents how to manage these behaviors. Level 3 is delivered through brief and flexible consultation, typically in the form of four 20-minute sessions. 
  • Level 4 (Standard Triple P and Group Triple P), an intensive strategy for parents of children with more severe behavior difficulties (e.g., aggressive or oppositional behavior), is designed to teach positive parenting skills and their application to a range of target behaviors, settings, and children. Level 4 is delivered in 10 individual or 8 group sessions totaling about 10 hours. 
  • Level 5 (Enhanced Triple P) is an enhanced behavioral family strategy for families in which parenting difficulties are complicated by other sources of family distress (e.g., relationship conflict, parental depression or high levels of stress). Program modules include practice sessions to enhance parenting skills, mood management strategies, stress coping skills, and partner support skills. Enhanced Triple P extends Standard Triple P by adding three to five sessions tailored to the needs of the family.

Variations of some Triple P levels are available for parents of young children with developmental disabilities (Stepping Stones Triple P) and for parents who have abused (Pathways Triple P).

Watch, Wait, Wonder

Watch, Wait, Wonder is a part of .

Watch, Wait and Wonder is a child led psychotherapeutic approach that specifically and directly uses the infant’s spontaneous activity in a free play format to enhance maternal sensitivity and responsiveness, the child’s sense of self and self-efficacy, emotion regulation, and the child-parent attachment relationship. The approach provides space for the infant/child and parent to work through developmental and relational struggles through play. Also central to the process is engaging the parent to be reflective about the child’s inner world of feelings, thoughts and desires, through which the parent recognizes the separate self of the infant and gains an understanding of her own emotional responses to her child. Because of the central role of the infant/child in the intervention and the relationship focus, Watch, Wait and Wonder differs from other interventions which tend to focus primarily on the more verbal partner, the parent.

Why Try

Why Try is a part of .

The Why Try Program is a strength-based approach to helping youth overcome their challenges and improve outcomes in the areas of truancy, behavior, and academics. Youth are taught social and emotional principles through a series of 10 pictures that teaches a discrete principle. These visuals are then reinforced by music and physical activities. 

The program addresses the following areas:

  • Academic Improvement
  • Attendance/Truancy
  • Counseling/Advisories/Coaches 
  • Literacy Development
  • Students with Disabilities
  • Study Skills
  • Substance Abuse
  • Life Skills Training 

Wraparound

Wraparound is a part of .

Wraparound is an intensive, holistic method of engaging with individuals with complex needs (most typically children, youth, and their families) so that they can live in their homes and communities and realize their hopes and dreams.

Since the term was first coined in the 1980s, “Wraparound” has been defined in different ways. It has been described as a philosophy, an approach, and a service. In recent years, Wraparound has been most commonly conceived of as an intensive, individualized care planning and management process. Wraparound is not a treatment per se. The Wraparound process aims to achieve positive outcomes by providing a structured, creative and individualized team planning process that, compared to traditional treatment planning, results in plans that are more effective and more relevant to the child and family. Additionally, Wraparound plans are more holistic than traditional care plans in that they are designed to meet the identified needs of caregivers and siblings and to address a range of life areas. Through the team-based planning and implementation process – as well as availability of research-based interventions that can address priority needs of youth and caregivers – Wraparound also aims to develop the problem-solving skills, coping skills, and self-efficacy of the young people and family members. Finally, there is an emphasis on integrating the youth into the community and building the family’s social support network.

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