Shasta

WorkAbility

WorkAbility is a part of .

 WorkAbility promotes independent living and provides comprehensive pre-employment and follow up services for youth in special education. WorkAbility provides secondary education students ages 14-22 with the opportunity to obtain marketable job skills while completing their education. WorkAbility is a school-based transition program working to benefit students, employers and the community by meeting the needs of local job markets.

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Triple P

Triple P is a part of .

The Triple P--Positive Parenting Program is a multilevel system or suite of parenting and family support strategies for families with children from birth to age 12, with extensions to families with teenagers ages 13 to 16. Developed for use with families from many cultural groups, Triple P is designed to prevent social, emotional, behavioral, and developmental problems in children by enhancing their parents' knowledge, skills, and confidence. The program, which also can be used for early intervention and treatment, is founded on social learning theory and draws on cognitive, developmental, and public health theories. Triple P has five intervention levels of increasing intensity to meet each family's specific needs. Each level includes and builds upon strategies used at previous levels:

  • Level 1 (Universal Triple P) is a media-based information strategy designed to increase community awareness of parenting resources, encourage parents to participate in programs, and communicate solutions to common behavioral and developmental concerns. 
  • Level 2 (Selected Triple P) provides specific advice on how to solve common child developmental issues (e.g., toilet training) and minor child behavior problems (e.g., bedtime problems). Included are parenting tip sheets and videotapes that demonstrate specific parenting strategies. Level 2 is delivered mainly through one or two brief face-to-face 20-minute consultations. 
  • Level 3 (Primary Care Triple P) targets children with mild to moderate behavior difficulties (e.g., tantrums, fighting with siblings) and includes active skills training that combines advice with rehearsal and self-evaluation to teach parents how to manage these behaviors. Level 3 is delivered through brief and flexible consultation, typically in the form of four 20-minute sessions. 
  • Level 4 (Standard Triple P and Group Triple P), an intensive strategy for parents of children with more severe behavior difficulties (e.g., aggressive or oppositional behavior), is designed to teach positive parenting skills and their application to a range of target behaviors, settings, and children. Level 4 is delivered in 10 individual or 8 group sessions totaling about 10 hours. 
  • Level 5 (Enhanced Triple P) is an enhanced behavioral family strategy for families in which parenting difficulties are complicated by other sources of family distress (e.g., relationship conflict, parental depression or high levels of stress). Program modules include practice sessions to enhance parenting skills, mood management strategies, stress coping skills, and partner support skills. Enhanced Triple P extends Standard Triple P by adding three to five sessions tailored to the needs of the family.

Variations of some Triple P levels are available for parents of young children with developmental disabilities (Stepping Stones Triple P) and for parents who have abused (Pathways Triple P).

Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS)

Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS) is a part of .

SPARCS stands for Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress.  SPARCS is a 16-session group intervention that was specifically designed to address the needs of chronically traumatized adolescents who may still be living with ongoing stress and may be experiencing problems in several areas of functioning.  These areas include difficulties with affect regulation and impulsivity, self-perception, relationships, somatization, dissociation, numbing and avoidance, and struggles with their own purpose and meaning in life as well as worldviews that make it difficult for them to see a future for themselves.  Overall goals of the program are to help teens cope more effectively in the moment, enhance self-efficacy, connect with others and establish supportive relationships, cultivate awareness, and create meaning in their lives. Group members learn and practice each of the core SPARCS skills throughout the intervention and frequently report use of these skills outside of group. Core components of this intervention include Mindfulness practice, relationship building/communication skills, Distress Tolerance, and Problem-solving and Meaning Making. Treatment also includes psychoeducation regarding stress, trauma, and triggers.

Motivational Interviewing

Motivational Interviewing is a part of .

Motivational interviewing is a form of collaborative conversation for strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. It is a person-centered counseling style for addressing the common problem of ambivalence about change by paying particular attention to the language of change.

It is designed to strengthen an individual's motivation for and movement toward a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person's own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.

Love and Logic Parenting

Love and Logic Parenting is a part of .

We offer Love and Logic parenting classes so that parents or guardians can learn to enjoy a better relationship with their kids. Parents want to enjoy their kids, have fun with them, and enjoy a less stressful family life. At no time in history have parents been more unsure of their parental role. Even the best are not all that sure about whether they are using the best techniques. They say that their kids don't appear to be much like the ones they knew in years past.

A lot of conflicting philosophies have been presented over the last 30 years. Many of these sound good, but don't seem to do the job of helping children become respectful, responsible, and a joy to be around. Many ideas, offered with the best of intentions, center around making sure that kids are comfortable and feeling good about themselves in order to have a good self-concept. However, we have discovered that self-confidence is achieved through struggle and achievement, not through someone telling you that you are number one. Self-confidence is not developed when kids are robbed of the opportunity to discover that they can indeed solve their own problems with caring adult guidance.

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